Saturday, 1 April 2017

Improv Pillowcase - A Finish

Just in time for the first quarter Finish-A-Long link-up, I finally put the finishing touches to my improvised pillowcase. It is my only finish of my 1st quarter FAL list but one finish is still a finish. I am quite happy with how it turned out too. 

Puppilalla, Patchwork, Pillowcase, Improv, Quilting, wonky log cabin, modern quilting, scrap buster, scrappy project


The denim coloured super soft and light cotton works well with the colours in the front and back panels and makes the project look more grown up. I kind of accidentally started the project in February last year and am glad to report that it is finally done. I am clearly not the fastest sewist. =) 

Puppilalla, Patchwork, Pillowcase, Improv, Quilting, wonky log cabin, modern quilting, scrap buster, scrappy project

I tried a few new things with this pillow. Following along several bloggers, I noticed that many sewists also use quilt batting in their pillowcases. I guess the reason is that they actually do quilt their pillowcases. Thus, I thought I might try that too this time round.

What I have failed to find out yet, is what is happening on the inside of these pillowcases. Is the batting covered by even more fabric on the inside? Is it not covered on the inside and lies 'raw' in its lint shedding state against the pillow? I seriously do not know. I, however, did not want any uncovered batting within my pillowcase and therefore tried one-sided adhesive cotton heatbond to a) secure the substantial amount of seams on the back of the improvised panels and b) to cover the backside of the backing inside the pillowcase-to-be.


Puppilalla, Patchwork, Pillowcase, Improv, Quilting, wonky log cabin, modern quilting, scrap buster, scrappy project




It worked so so. So in my experimental state of mind, I had laid out the entire length of the pillowcase panel, put a piece of batting, where the front would be and covered all that with the one-sided heatbond. I bonded away and had thereby secured the seams and covered the back of the backing in one go. It worked all fine for covering and securing the multitude of seams. (This is going to be my new secret weapon in pillowcase making) However, I still had a sort wiggle room or air pocket between the batting and the front panel. And this wiggle room then caused trouble when I tried to unobtrusively quilt a few lines on the front panel as the layers puckered and shifted somewhat.

Puppilalla, Patchwork, Pillowcase, Improv, Quilting, wonky log cabin, modern quilting, scrap buster, scrappy project


The upshot is that the idea works in principle (no raw edges or seams within my pillowcase, yay  =) but that some fine-tuning is still required. Maybe, I should quilt the front panel with the batting first before adding the heatbond as a finish.

I also for the first time ever used bias tape to bind a pillowcase. I must say it makes a very sophisticated finish.

I have the next pillowcase idea lined up already. I snatched up some gingiber animal panels at a local quilt shop once they posted on IG that they had those and they basically scream 'Use us! ' so I feel I might oblige.

Linking up. I noticed that there are literally hundreds of projects linked as finished. Quite amazing how big the Finish-A-Long initiative has grown.

http://www.shecanquilt.ca/2017/01/2017-finish-long-link-up-your-q1-lists.html





6 comments:

  1. Really beautiful, improvised pillow! I make the pillows so that the front piece is like mini quilt (quilted with batting and cotton fabric, usually thin left over piece) and the back side I make usually with one piece fabrics without any quilting or batting. If I wouldn't be lazy to add zipper, then I would make quilted piece for the back side, too. x Teje

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  2. What a fun improv cushion! When I make cushion covers I usually use a piece of plain cotton as a backing to the quilted piece. I think it gives a nice finish and the batting isn't being worn away and tugged each time the cushion insert is removed and replace. On behalf of the 2017 global FAL hosts, thank you for participating in this quarter's FAL.

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  3. I do pillow fronts like Sarah, using muslin, cheap on-sale cotton, or even an old sheet as the backing for the quilting since you never see it.

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  4. I haven't made a pillow yet, but the ones I have seen in person do have a (cheap) cotton backing on the quilted front to protect the batting.

    PS: The navy denim looks great. What is it?

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  5. I often line my cushions! It looks great and I love the binding

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  6. oops ! I forgot to say: Thanks for linking up to #scraptastictuesday

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